Learning To Appreciate My Mother

Learning To Appreciate My Mother - purposedrivencharlene.com - faithtoraisenate.com - charlenebullard.com
2 min read

Recently, I have been spending time with my mother. That may not seem strange to some, but for me, it is. Unlike some mothers and daughters, my mother and I are not best friends. Not at all! We are different creatures, or should I say characters.

There are many differences between us.  My mother can be a little loud (or a lot), and she speaks what’s on her mind. I, on the other hand, am a little more reserved and subdued. We also have different interest. She likes to attend concerts often, and she enjoys going to white parties, and eating at buffets. For me, concerts are fine, every once in a while. I am definitely not into the white party scene, and I don’t particularly care for an all-you-can eat buffet, I would rather cook my food.

Not too long ago, I looked at my mother and I can see that she is getting older. I noticed the new fine lines that have emerged on her face, wrinkles on her neck, aches in her body, and tiredness in her steps. I see her need for help in navigating the healthcare system and her medical benefits. I have even sat with her, during a medical appointment, to make sure that she understood the procedure being offered.

About a  week ago, as we sat at my son’s birthday dinner, snapping filtered-selfies on “Snapchat,” I realized that I don’t see the issues that we had in my youth. Those problems are a distant and faded memory. The arguments and the anger, and me leaving home at 18 years of age, no longer bothers us. Perhaps it is because we’ve made amends in our many conversations and admittance of wrongs, attached with apologies. Or maybe, I realized that none of those issues of the past are no longer important. Instead, what matters is that I’m appreciating my mother, caring for her, and I am honoring God.

Learning To Appreciate My Mother - purposedrivencharlene.com - faithtoraisenate.com - charlenebullard.com

Learning To Appreciate My Mother - purposedrivencharlene.com - faithtoraisenate.com - charlenebullard.com

 

And, as I share this testimony, I can’t help to think of all the mothers and daughters who may be estranged or have problems that are deeper, things that are not easily resolved. Yet, I ask you, if you can, do it…make amends. Life is truly too short.

I have learned that one day, one of us will no longer be here, and I want to make sure that I did as God commanded me to do……appreciate, honor, and love my mother.

Faithtoraisenate.com - CharleneBullard.com - Purposedrivencharlene.com

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  1. 3
    carlos SP

    I was born and raised among women who were microentrepreneurs, small merchants here in Brazil, who needed to take initiatives to take care of themselves, to do their own work, in front of their houses, marriage, families, children, relatives and of others; these were my mothers; and there is a big deal of surrender, and dedication or sacrifice to it, from my parents and others.
    And I, in seeking my own way, took my life to understand this, but the mercy of the Lord helps me to understand.

        • 9
          Charlene

          Ha Ha Ha Ha!!! I’m laughing! No, it just a party that celebrities started. Everyone wears all white. Or all black or black with a little color. There are a lot of variations. It is not my scene. I went to one, a friend had everyone where all white for her 30th birthday party and she wore something different. It was nice. My mother goes to enjoy old school/60’s, 70’s, 80’s, music. She goes with her friends. Funny!!

  2. 10
    dancingpalmtrees

    I also had a somewhat different relationship with my Mother growing up. Basically I was Daddy’s little girl. However my Dad always reinforced Mom’s rules. They were a team. What hurt me was seeing my Mother engulfed by mental illness and alcohol. However she always took care of us. We were always clean, fed, homework done and bedtime prayers.
    My Mother was dealing with the emotional impact of having a disabled son. In the 1960s women were blamed when the child came out disabled. Mom caught hell. She sacrificed her life for Stephen and I.
    Despite the fact that she suffered from schizophrenic episodes, nervous breakdown and suicide attempt she loved us. Fortunately before my Mom died we sat down and talked. When she explained that she was overwhelmed I understood.
    I truly miss her every day. It’s best to resolve all difference before they die.
    My conscience is clear and never a day goes by that I don’t mourn the loss and Mom is forever in my thoughts.

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